click to enlarge On April 8, Bruce Rushton broke the news that the CWLP generator breakdown in November that caused a repair bill estimated at $6 million was caused by human error. Files later obtained by Illinois Times under the state Freedom of Information Act showed that a supervisor was suspended for three days for his role in the mishap. City officials have declined to release additional details.
On April 8, Bruce Rushton broke the news that the CWLP generator breakdown in November that caused a repair bill estimated at $6 million was caused by human error. Files later obtained by Illinois Times under the state Freedom of Information Act showed that a supervisor was suspended for three days for his role in the mishap. City officials have declined to release additional details.

We welcome letters. Please include your full name, address and telephone number. We edit all letters. Send them to letters@illinoistimes.com.

CWLP DEBACLE

Thank you, Bruce Rushton, but is it really necessary to have you expose our city officials' decision to hide the truth from us tax-drained citizens ("What happened? City still mum on CWLP mishap," April 9)? I guess it is. The reason for the $6 million breakdown at the CWLP power plant five months ago must be none of our business. When questioned by Bruce, Mayor Langfelder, using the age-old practice of CYA, passed the ball to Jim Zerkle and Doug Brown. We still don't have an official answer. It seems they are also good at CYA.

A glimmer of light was shed on the issue by Alderman Shawn Gregory. Thank you, sir, but it was only a glimmer. May I remind the mayor and our other city officials that we are all big boys and girls out here paying our high taxes and high utility bills, and we can handle the truth. Do we really have to wait another five months for an honest explanation for this debacle?

Larry Wedding
Springfield

FAIR PENALTY?

Sounds about right – a $6 million loss = three days suspension = $2 million per suspended day. Sounds fair to me ("Supervisor suspended for three days, April 15).

Nancy Wilson
Rochester
Via Illinoistimes.com

NEED TO READ

Right after my public library closed – but before all the "non-essential" businesses, including used book stores, were forced to close – I blew $80 purchasing 25 paperback mysteries, averaging 400 pages each.  Thought this might last me – but I was wrong.  I've been parsing – only reading half a book a day – but I am now down to my last unread book.

I am virus-free (take my temperature twice a day, only go outside once a week) – but I need to read! I'm a brain-damaged old broad on fixed income.  My SafeLink cellphone is not a smart phone; my home computer is an old-school Windows 98 tower PC, which cannot be updated.

Lincoln Library is closed; so are all of the discount book resale shops in Springfield. Must I buy a Kindle or some other kind of e-reader just to read books?

I know that so many have supported small food banks – give if you can, take what you need. Is there anything similar to this for books?  Could something be set up? I would happily donate food in exchange for books.

Molly Kennedy
Springfield

Editor's note: Land of Lincoln Bookshare's website has a list of area Little Free Libraries (lolbookshare/local-free-libraries), which operate on the take-one-or-leave-one principle. In addition, several of the Springfield-area used bookstores are now offering delivery or contactless curbside pick-up.

Illinois Times has provided readers with independent journalism for more than 40 years, from news and politics to arts and culture.

Now more than ever, we’re asking for your support to continue providing our community with real news that everyone can access, free of charge.

We’re also offering a home delivery option as an added convenience for friends of the paper.

Click here to subscribe, or simply show your support for Illinois Times.

Comments (0)

Add a comment

Add a Comment