THANK A NURSE

This is a beautiful article ("A nurse's please: Help us fight this war," Oct. 21). Thanks to Carly Hinkle for sharing her story, and more importantly, thanks for all she has done to fight COVID. The body bag comments brought me to tears. I hope by baring her soul, she inspires more people to get vaccinated.

Sergio Murer

Via Illinoistimes.com

SECOND CHANCE?

It all depends on the crime and the person, like a parole hearing ("Forgiveness or enforcement," Oct. 21). Our penal system needs an overhaul. Many drug offenders and non-violent offenders are in prison when they should be in rehab and job training. Many early offenders need reform school, not prison. And once they test out, they should be able to carry a card that employers and landlords would recognize as a candidate for second chances, or something like that.

Lisa Gillespie Galloway

Via Facebook.com/illinoistimes

NOT THE SAME PERSON

The state needs to do something with the revoked-for-life driver's license situation, too. I haven't had a DUI in 21 years and still can't get a full reinstatement, only restricted with a breath alcohol ignition interlock device. I'm not the same person I was 21 years ago.

John E. Sanders

Via Facebook.com/illinoistimes

KEEP VIRTUAL OPTION

I attend public meetings as part of my job, and participation has increased with the use of the online option ("Public meetings should be in-person," Oct. 21). Isn't that the goal? I don't see how providing a virtual option hurts democracy.

Jeremy Reed

Via illinoistimes.com

KEEP BOTH

In-person meetings are critical to our democracy and should continue to be required by our government entities. Constituents should be allowed to appear in-person and present their perspectives and opinions. Additionally, now that we have the virtual option available, it, too, should be continued, as it gives the constituency more opportunity to attend. It should not be an either/or option, but both.

Dan Mueller

Via Illinoistimes.com

NEVER ASSUME

So I hand you a gun and tell you it's OK, it's not loaded, just point it at your kids and pull the trigger ("Living for two," Oct. 28). What if you watched me put dummy bullets in the gun – they look like real bullets. Do you really want to pull that trigger without checking for yourself? Perhaps you know nothing about guns. Would you even accept the gun to hold?

Most people I know would never pull the trigger on any real gun without checking to see if it was loaded or not. Even more so, everyone I know that is trained to handle guns won't take a gun from another without first asking to open the breech/cylinder and pull the clip before they take it. It is how we are all taught.

Think of the gun as a baby. When you hand that baby to someone else, you expect them to care for it. It is not your responsibility after you have chosen someone responsible to care for it. It is theirs.

When you receive the baby, you are careful to make certain it is not harmed, does not hit its head, get too much sun, etc. This is why when someone hands us a child we often say, "Do I need to feed it?" or "Has it been changed?" We take that job very seriously.

Craig P. Williams Sr.

Springfield

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