Letters to the editor 3/24/22

click to enlarge A documentary premiering next month at the Hoogland Center for the Arts, No Title for Tracey, tells the story of Tracey Meares, who in 1984 was on track to become the first Black valedictorian at Springfield High School, but a white student was selected for recognition instead. - CREDIT: FACEBOOK.COM/NOTITLEFORTRACEY
Credit: facebook.com/NoTitleforTracey
A documentary premiering next month at the Hoogland Center for the Arts, No Title for Tracey, tells the story of Tracey Meares, who in 1984 was on track to become the first Black valedictorian at Springfield High School, but a white student was selected for recognition instead.

We welcome letters. Please include your full name, address and telephone number. We edit all letters. Send them to editor@illinoistimes.com.

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RACIST TOWN

Tracey Meares' experience is appalling ("The Black valedictorian who never received the title," March 17). I came from the Chicago area to go to graduate school here and immediately moved to Southern California. Upon my return in the late 1980s, I remarked to my husband that Springfield was one of the most racist towns I had ever seen – and I grew up in a south suburb of Chicago. It was subtle racism, but evident nonetheless. Kudos to Maria Ansley and the wonderful Dr. Nicole Florence for spearheading this documentary.

Shelley Davis Helton
Via Facebook.com/illinostimes

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DIDN'T DIMINISH

This saddens me to read of incidents like this, but I'm glad to learn that it did not diminish Tracey Meares' character, nor her goals for higher education and career ambitions. Hopefully, learning of situations like this can cause people to change for the better. Our society definitely has much room for improvement.

Mike Pippen
Via Facebook.com/illinostimes

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ANOTHER GARDEN

I read and shared your article on community gardens ("Gathering to garden," March 17). It will hopefully be helpful to educate some people that not all are communal. At Douglas Avenue United Methodist Church, we rent boxes for $10 and have one community strawberry box. We are in the process of replacing our old, wooden deteriorating boxes with metal boxes. We installed several last fall and have more to assemble. The church took down an old, rotting tree which opened up a lot of sunshine.

Anyway, just wanted to say great article and happy gardening.  We are having our pastor bless our boxes after church on April 3, so about 11:40 a.m. if anyone wants to check us out.

Dianna Trost
Springfield

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LOST PROVIDERS

I can no longer see my providers that know my conditions and are aware of my history ("In-network doctors in decline," March 17). And I cannot change insurance because my work has Blue Cross Blue Shield. Stop playing games with those who need your services, BCBS. It is beyond time to end this power play.

Judy Simon McEvoy
Via Facebook.com/illinostimes

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ONE PROVIDER EASIER

I'm not sure how everyone else has dealt with this, but it has actually made my life easier. My primary doctor at Springfield Memorial Hospital has agreed to manage anything my son and I were seeing a specialist for. So now we are only seeing one doctor in one building, and he is closer to home. We saw many good and kind providers at Springfield Clinic, but won't be returning even if they come to an agreement.

I guess there might be an issue if our chronic illnesses got worse and a primary doctor didn't want to handle it, but so far, keeping one provider has been nice. I understand this is unfortunate for Springfield Clinic and the providers there, but this is what they drove me to do.

Kels Pedigo
Via Facebook.com/illinostimes